Storke Tower and its Importance

 

This is Storke Tower, located on the campus of UCSB in Southern California. This tower  was named after one of Santa Barbara’s favorite men, Thomas More Storke. Throughout the years, the plaza beneath Storke Tower has been functioning as a place bringing  the community together. Storke Tower has been the location for many memorializing events, like its own creation with Thomas More Storke, and both memorializing and historically significant events such as the March against Racism in April of 2016 that have taken place in the near past. Of the many things that have happened on and around this campus, Storke Tower serves as a memory container, keeping the remembrance of these events that take place in the community and amongst the campus, in the same thoughts as Storke Tower. The use of Storke Tower as this container allows for people to memorialize these certain events collectively as a community, and remember the events important to them.

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Storke Tower has been on the University of California, Santa Barbara campus for many years now and is very important to the student body of this school, whether or not the students think so. Most students wouldn’t immediately think that Storke Tower was very important if asked, because people sometimes forget the things that hold them and others around them together as one. Storke Tower is located approximately in the center of campus, and carries this point to play very important roles for the students on its campus. Its easily accessible location allows for students to become extra close with one another and use Storke Tower for any of the many things it has to offer.

 

Storke tower being built

From the beginning of the building of Storke Tower,in its namesake, Thomas More Storke, its beauty and status of highest building in Santa Barbara County has allowed people to easily remember what this building is and why it was built. (Photo Credit: Flickriver)

 

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UCSB students begin a march for National Day of Action Against Racism at Storke Tower(Center of Campus) and into Isla Vista on the 14th of April, 2016. They begin their march at Storke Tower, the center of campus, acting as a container for people to remember what Storke Tower is, the importance of the event taking place in the community, and how it is important for the march itself, to stop the act of racism in our community today. (Photo Credit: Ari Plachta)

 

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The carillon beneath Storke Tower hosting a concert for the students of UCSB and the residents of Isla Vista. This concert takes place in the plaza, further emphasizing the idea of Storke Tower being the centralized piece of the UCSB campus, as well as a container for the importance of it. The container holding the community memory of Storke’s importance (Photo Credit: Levi Michaels)

 

 

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The beautiful sunset on Storke Tower with the bell tower on the upper level. All around campus provides a beautiful view of Storke Tower and holds an elaborate memory for the students on campus of what they have on this campus, and the lovely life they are able to live on the UCSB campus.

 

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Night time at Storke Tower with the flashing red lights towards the top of the tower where the bell tower is located, to warn incoming aircraft. This tower can even be seen at night from the surrounding area of Isla Vista and Goleta, and serves as a beautiful sight as well as a location indicator for students and others in the community. 

 

 

Works Cited

Pandell, Lexi. “The Legacy of Thomas M. Storke.” The Daily Nexus The Legacy of Thomas M                   Storke Comments. Daily Nexus, 31 May 2011. Web. 09 Sept. 2016.

Rock, Trent. “Storke Tower 1969 – a Photo on Flickriver.” Storke Tower 1969. Flickriver, n.d.                Web. 09 Sept. 2016.

Plachta, By Ari. “UCSB’s Second Million Student March.” UCSB’s Second Million Student                            March. N.p., 15 Apr. 2016. Web. 09 Sept. 2016.

Michaels, Levi. “UCSB Storke Plaza.” Santa Barbara Independent. N.p., 1 Oct. 2012. Web.